Media release 3rd November 2013

Previously a long-time resident of Ohope, Vic Davis’s commitment to supporting others endures past his lifetime through the charitable trust he established: The Vic Davis Memorial Trust.

The key purpose of the Vic Davis Memorial Trust is to support individuals and organisations in their study and research in the field of mental health.   “People undertaking study and training in the field of mental health have limited access to scholarships and grants to support their work,” said Trust chairman Mike Shepherd adding, “Vic Davis established this trust as his legacy, to offer that support, particularly to people from the Eastern Bay of Plenty and to national research in the field.”

 The Trust continues to support the potentially breakthrough research being undertaken by Dr Julia Rucklidge of Canterbury University regarding the use of micronutrients as a treatment option for ADHD.   Micronutirents (vitamins and minerals) are receiving growing recognition as a promising treatment for many psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder, depression and ADHD.   Dr Rucklidge’s research plans to investigatethe impact of micronutrients on ADHD in children, using a randomiized control design. effectiveness of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) as a treatment approach to ADHD in adults.

New recipients for 2014 are Whakatane resident Katharine Preston,  Opotiki resident Anne Doree, Setareh Zareiewho is currently studying at Waikato University and Rowan Clements from Kamo.

Having studied for her BA Honours, ,majoring in Psychology, Katharine Preston will use the scholarship to support her study at Massey University for a doctorate in clinical psychology, a further three years of study.

Anne Doree will be known to many for her work supporting children and families over many years.   The scholarship she has received from the Trust is to support her advanced training to become a registered practitioner of the ‘Watch, Wait and Wonder’ intervention, a therapy that helps parents understand their young children and support them to deal with serious problems early, to reduce their impact.

Applications to the trust are considered on an annual basis, with applications closing on the 31st July annually.   Full details of the application process, the criteria and the application forms are available on the Trust website: www.vicdavistrust.co.nz .   Applications will only be accepted on the application forms provided on the website and all queries with regard to the criteria or process should be emailed to:  administrator@vicdavistrust.co.nz

Additional grants have been made from the Trust to assist Rotary exchange students .

Vic's Legacy Lives On

Previously a long-time resident of Ohope, Vic Davis’s commitment to supporting others endures past his lifetime through the charitable trust he established: The Vic Davis Memorial Trust.

To date just under $200,000 has been granted to a range of beneficiaries. “I know the new learning that I have received in 2009 through the assistance of the Vic Davis Trust has been absolutely well used within my work in the community” commented recipient Harata Te Amo-Simeon.

The key purpose of the Vic Davis Memorial Trust is to support individuals and organisations in their study and research in the field of mental health. “People undertaking study and training in the field of mental health have limited access to scholarships and grants to support their work,” said Trust chairman Mike Shepherd adding, “Vic Davis established this trust as his legacy, to offer that support, particularly to people from the Eastern Bay of Plenty and to national research in the field.” Four of last year’s Bay of Plenty beneficiaries have received funding for a further year. Ohope resident Fleur MacRae continues her post graduate Play Therapy study and comments, “The financial assistance from the Trust makes this study possible for me and I am deeply grateful.” Janie de Malmanche is completing her thesis into the experience of employment of those involved in the KAI programme, an employment programme within the EBOP kiwifruit industry for those with experience of mental illness.

While Neville Gibbons’ focus is on alcohol and drug addiction counselling and his study is through the Wellington Institute of Technology

Applications For 2010 Funding within the Mental Health Field

Applications are now open for the 2010 round of funding available through the Vic Davis Memorial Trust, and those involved in study and/or research in the field of mental health are encouraged to apply.

2009 was the inaugural year for fund distribution and 11 people were recipients of funding to support them in their study and research in the 2010 academic year. “The funding from the Vic Davis Trust means I can concentrate on my course work and assignments, attend Massey’s Wellington campus courses twice a year and purchase the necessary textbooks and software, all of which would normally increase the financial stress that comes with study,” said Maakere Marr, an extramural post graduate student whose home community is Matata. “Even though I live in Auckland, this far reaching support validates a sense of still being a significant part of my home community,” she added.

Vic Davis was well known as a philanthropist with a special interest in the field of mental health and in the wellbeing of youth. His memorial trust is an ongoing expression of that keen interest and offers three categories of grants and scholarships:

  1. Scholarships at undergraduate level for individuals wishing to undertake training as a mental health practitioner
  2. Scholarships for individuals undertaking post graduate study or research
  3. Research grants for organizations researching in the field of mental health.

The fields of study the individual recipients are currently undertaking are varied. Tauranga resident Janie de Malmanche is undertaking her Masters study in occupational therapy. Her research is based on exploring the stories of employment from the perspective of people with an experience of mental illness who have been part of the local KAI programme. “Without the support from the Vic Davis Trust I don’t know if I would have been brave enough to undertake this study,” she said adding, “The funds I received have allowed me to set aside protected time to carry out my study.”

Whakatane resident Fleur MacRae endorses that sense of support. Her post graduate study specializes in play therapy and she values the fact that the funds enable her to study without impacting on her young family financially. “For this I am thankful and appreciative to Vic Davis, his family and the Vic Davis Memorial Trust.”

The 2009 recipient of a research grant was Dr Julia Rucklidge, Associate Professor in Canterbury University’s Department of Psychology. Her groundbreaking research is into the effect of micronutrients on mood and behavior in adults with ADHD. “The support from the Trust has enabled us to go full steam ahead on completing our randomized controlled study,” she explained. “The support from the Trust gives us the flexibility to respond to the public need to gain evidence either for or against the use of micronutrients in the treatment of mental health issues.”

Applications for funding for the 2011 academic year close on the 31st August and will be considered by trustees in September. Full details of the application process, the criteria for selection and all application forms are available on the Trust website: www.vicdavistrust.co.nz. Applications will only be accepted on the application forms on the website and late applications will not be considered. All queries with regard to the criteria or process should be emailed to administrator@vicdavistrust.co.nz

Philanthropist Leaves $2 Million for the Bay

OHOPE philanthropist Vic Davis has left a $2 million legacy to the people of the Eastern Bay of
Plenty.

Two-and-a-half years after the death of the well known engineer, sailor, Rotarian and community leader, the Rotary Club of Whakatane West has announced the establishment of a charitable trust in his memory.

The Vic Davis Memorial Trust, which will operate under the terms of a trust deed detailed in Mr
Davis’ will, is expected to distribute more than $100,000 a year in grants and scholarships with a focus on mental health.

Mr Davis passed away in 2004 and left the bulk of his estate in a trust with very specific charitable aims. Trust chairman Mike Shepherd said the initial fund was more than $2 million. Seventy per cent of the income generated from this would be available for distribution with the rest being reinvested to grow the fund.

The trust’s primary objective would be to assist with promotion, investigation and research into mental health - including its nature, origin, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, care and cure.
It would also fund the costs and expenses of teenagers accepted for the Rotary Student
Exchange Programme.

If there were no suitable applications in either of these areas, the unused income from the trust
could be used for craftspeople training at the Waterwheel Museum.
According to those that knew him, Mr Davis’ life was one of success and he was someone able to cheerfully motivate and encourage others to great heights.
He had more than his fair share of tragedy - his son died in infancy, and his daughter in tragic
circumstances in her late teens - to which he responded by helping others facing similar
problems.

Mr Davis was born in 1921 and spent his early years in Blockhouse Bay. He began work as a
cadet with the Waitemata Power Board and then joined the New Zealand Army early in the war.
He was transferred to the navy where he served on the destroyer HMS Leander in the torpedo
and depth-charge team. His ship was torpedoed in 1943 and limped back to Tulagi in the
Solomons for repairs.
He returned to the Waitemata Power Board after the war then moved to Whakatane Board Mills as a chief electrical engineer, where he played a leading role in the expansion and updating of the mill, and training of apprentices and technicians for 30 years.
He was a charter member of the Rotary Club of Whakatane West and its second president.
Mr Davis was a well known sailor and fisherman and he designed and built a large double-ender boat which he would launch off the beach at West End Ohope in all but the wildest conditions and motor to White Island and back.

His leadership qualities were evident from three major initiatives. He mobilised the team of
trampers and skiers who formed the Whakapapa Mountain Club. He also organised a team of
local volunteers who went to outlying villages in the Fiji islands to help with the provision of power and water supplies and provide advice on sawmilling and house building.
He was also DoC’s official gannet bander on White Island and for decades he organised parties
of volunteers to travel there to carry out this task.

After his death Mr Davis’ West End home was sold at auction for $1.485 million, which was a
record for a Whakatane coastal home at the time.
The Vic Davis Memorial Trust is a completely separate entity from the Rotary Club of Whakatane West although the majority of trustees come from the club. They are chairman Mike Shepherd, vice chair Tony Bonne, secretary Rob Rowson, and trustees Karen Smith, Mark Bruce, Brian Jackson and Bruce Davis - Vic’s brother.

Applications for grants will be called for in due course.
Mr Shepherd said there were no restrictions on where applicants could come from but initially the trust would prefer applications to come from the Eastern Bay of Plenty.